Imagine Providence

Hear the voices of people boldly and creatively tackling social issues in Providence and explore how you can be part of the story.

  • December 23, 2014
    Imagine:

    The Woonasquatucket River's health suffered as a result of pollution from the industrial revolution. The Woonasquatucket River Watershed Council (WRWC) integrates art, science, and education to improve the health and safety of the Woonasquatucket River while introducing Providence residents to this urban natural resource. WRWC introduces members from all parts of the Providence community to the river through the Woonasquatucket River Greenway, a biking and running path, with kayaking opportunties on the water. By improving water quality and ecosystem health in conjunction with public art projects and community support, WRWC is revitalizing an idyllic getaway in the middle of a bustling city.

    Executive Director Alicia Lehrer describes how the river health has improved since she first saw it and future improvements she envisions.

    Woonasquatucket River Watershed Council
  • December 23, 2014
    Imagine:

    A new, innovative city government office, the Office of Sustainability has proactively addressed pressing needs in the Providence community through fast-paced, hard work. The Office of Sustainability focuses on environmental issues that impact all aspects of Providence residents' lives, from transportation to stormwater runoff. Their sustainability action plan, Sustainable Providence, released in fall of 2014, was created through a collaborative process with community members, reflecting the strong role the Providece community has had in shaping a vision for local sustainability.

    Sheila Dormody, the director of the Office of Sustainability, shares how local government is catalyzing change in Providence.

    Office of Sustainability, City of Providence
  • October 23, 2014
    Imagine:

    When you walk through the door of Recycle-A-Bike (RAB), right off of Olneyville Square, you enter a microcosm of Providence where people from all walks of life build relationships by teaching and learning all about the used bicycles they are refurbishing. As a volunteer-based bike cooperative, RAB gives anyone the opportunity to earn a bike or fix a bike in exchange for their time. In addition to providing an Open Shop for people to learn how to fix their bikes, RAB sells refurbished bicycles, teaches Build-A-Bike courses, trains highschool students to be bike mechanics, provides tune-ups at farmers markets, and more!

    Patrick McEvoy, executive director of RAB, invites you to celebrate RAB's vision for a community connected by bicycles.

    Recycle-A-Bike
  • October 23, 2014
    Imagine:

    WIth 93 parks in the City of Providence, the Partnership for Providence Parks cultivates strong relationships between these parks and their surrounding neighborhoods. Through partnerships with city offices, community organizations, and community members, the Partnership for Providence Parks makes these parks the epicenter of community activity through PlayCorps, concerts, and other festivities. Ensuring that both children and adults feel happy and safe in their neighborhood park gives the Providence community an abundance of places to get together and have a good time.

    Wendy Nilson, the executive director and founder of the Partnership for Providence Parks, shares how Providence residents are reclaiming their outdoor spaces.

    Partnership for Providence Parks
  • October 23, 2014
    Imagine:

    With Narragansett Bay at the heart of its mission, Save the Bay integrates education, science, and policy, engaging community members of all ages to take ownership over the 256 miles of coastline in our backyard. Since 1970, Save the Bay's dedicated team have restored Narragansett Bay to health, creating numerous economic and recreational opportunities including an annual swim across Naragansett Bay and an interactive marine exploration center. Hosting regular coastal cleanups, providing educational programming in urban schools, monitoring the Bay, and advocating for Bay-friendly policies allow Save the Bay to continue protecting the Ocean State.

    Executive Director Jonathan Stone shares how Save the Bay's ecosystem-based approach to transforming Narragansett Bay has had tangible results since his daily rowing practices in the Bay as a member of Brown's crew team.

    Save the Bay
  • October 23, 2014
    Imagine:

    When artist Holly Ewald facilitated a community redesign of signs at Mashapaug Pond to say it was sick, she had no idea it would turn into a fully-fledged movement. UPP Arts weaves art, science, and activism together to raise awarness about environmental health. In addition to hosting an annual celebratory parade drawing people from all parts of Providence outfitted in all kinds of crazy costumes, UPP Arts educates students and residents throughout the year about pollution urban ponds.

    Artistic Director Holly Ewald paints a vivid picture of UPP Arts, telling its story through snapshots of the procession.

    UPP Arts